Online Videos Bring More Business

Is online video consumption really growing?

Do people really have time to watch videos online?

Should I use videos to market my business?

Here are a few points brought by Robert Kyncl, the Chief Business Officer at YouTube at CES 2016:

Right now, watching video—whether on TV or online—is the single most important media activity for people.

75 percent of all video will come over the internet by 2020.

More than five hours a day are spent watching video, and those hours fuel a $200 Billion economy, with the majority of that money coming from Pay TV subscriptions.

Only 2 other things people spend more time than watching videos: Sleeping and working.

New research conducted with Nielsen shows that the time 18 to 34 year old spent on TV fell nine percent last year. Meanwhile, this same audience spent 48% more time on YouTube, with mobile viewing making up the largest source of growth.

And on YouTube, the average time people spend watching video on their mobile device is forty minutes, a gain of 50 percent year-on-year.

This is just a tiny slice of what is happening out there related to videos. There is also streaming videos from the couch. Consumers spent 42.5 billion hours streaming on Netflix during 2015, up from 29.1 billion hours in 2014. They spent 12 billion hours streaming in the last quarter alone, up from 8 billion a year ago.

Roku, a streaming solution for content creators and info marketers has now 8% of the market in the US and it is present in several countries.

Video is by far one of the best opportunities for business owners, content creators and info-marketers.

By creating a simple video and adding it to your home page 3 things will happen:

1. Conversion on your website tends to increase by 35%.

2. The video will show on YouTube when people are searching for a solution to a problem.

3. The same video will most likely also appear on Google in higher places than your website, generating leads and traffic. The same video… one effort, multiple results.

Consider that this video will also inform and educate your prospects and buyers.

Creating a video can be as simple as getting your cel phone out of your pocket, you just need to make sure that the video will bring results.

Why are we talking about videos? To bring home the fact that learning with videos and live streaming is the way to go.

Online videos
Online videos

Millennials Don’t Watch Live TV

When behavior changes the only option for the market and business owners is to adapt. There is no coming back. Our behavior in the way we consumer information, media and knowledge is changing despite our age.

Millennials are driving this change and here are some facts:

Advertisers looking to target Millennials – and that includes just about everyone these days – take note: Live TV is not the place to find them.

Anecdotally, this has long appeared to be true. Ratings for the adults 18-34 demo have been on the decline for some time, and a quick look around a college campus tells you that young people these days are glued to their mobile screens.

A new report confirms this digital tipping point. Millennials spend more time with digital now than they do watching live TV, according to a cross-platform study by comScore.

But what’s perhaps just as interesting is that not only have Millennials transitioned fully to digital, but the older Generation X is poised to join them.

“There’s a clear trend showing that as demographic segments get younger, those consumers are more likely to spend time on their mobile device and less likely to spend time watching live TV,” notes the report.

“It’s possible that digital share of time spent among 35-54 year-olds might also soon surpass live TV.”

The study finds that among total digital and TV time, Millennials devote 40 percent of their time to mobile and 14 percent to desktop web usage.

millennials-viewingtv

That leaves just under 50 percent for live TV, and it’s a number comScore anticipates will fall quickly, based on its crossplatform measurement for fourth quarter of last year.

Interestingly, 35-54s weren’t too far behind in digital usage. Though they tend more toward desktop (21 percent) than Millennials, they total 43 percent of time with digital and 57 percent with live TV.

That’s in contrast to Boomers over 55, who spend 70 percent of time with live TV.

Overall, the generations do share one thing in common – an increasing dependence on smartphones. Usage is up 78 percent since 2013.

We at Curious Mondo pay a lot of attention to this type of information. That is why our courses can be watched from any platform.

millennials watching tv
millennials watching tv

Training Millenials

A study conducted by Price water house Coopers revealed that by 2020, millennials will form 50% of the world’s manpower. They behave in a different way than Baby boomers for example and want to learn in a different way as well.

Being able to interact, learn anywhere, have extremely updated information and find mentors rather than teachers are a few points important to them.

training millennials

Of course, here at Curious Mondo they find all that!!!!!

Improve your sales skills

This week we have a great course on sales skills with consultant Clay Neves: Personal Sales Dynamics: Winning the Infinite Game of Profitable Business Relationships

You will not only improve your sales skills but your approach to sales

Reserve your seat for this free online course

Personal Sales Dynamics

Learning A New Skill Works Best To Keep Your Brain Sharp

Learning A New Skill Works Best To Keep Your Brain Sharp

Brain training is big business, with computerized brain games touted as a way to help prevent memory loss. But new research shows you might be better off picking up a challenging new hobby.

To test this theory, Dr. Denise Park, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas at Dallas, randomly assigned 200 older people to different activities. Some learned digital photography. Another group took up quilting.

Quilting, which requires measuring and calculating, also helped improve participants’ memory.i
Quilting, which requires measuring and calculating, also helped improve participants’ memory.
/Courtesy of UT Dallas
“Quilting may not seem like a mentally challenging task,” Park says. “But if you’re a novice and you’re cutting out all these abstract shapes, it’s a very demanding and complex task.”

The groups spent 15 hours a week for three months learning their new skills. They were then given memory tests and compared with several control groups.

“Rather than just comparing them to people who did nothing, we compared them to a group of people who had fun but weren’t mentally challenged as much,” Park says.

That “social group” did things like watch movies or reminisce about past vacations. Another control group worked quietly at home, listening to the radio or classical music or playing easy games and puzzles.

Park’s research, which was published in the journal Psychological Science, showed that not all activities are created equal. Only people who learned a new skill had significant gains.

“We found quite an improvement in memory, and we found that when we tested our participants a year later, that was maintained,” Park says.

Study participants were trained in practical reasoning skills like managing medications.
SHOTS – HEALTH NEWS
Older Folks Get Modest Memory Boost From Brain Boot Camp
Image from a test from the study
SCIENCE
Brain Training Games Won’t Pump Up IQs, Study Says
The greatest improvement was for the people who learned digital photography and Photoshop — perhaps, Park says, because it was the most difficult.

Jimmy Wilson, 82, agreed to learn to use a computer, a camera and Photoshop for the trial. “That was really quite a challenge for me when I got into the photo class,” Wilson says, “because it involved a computer and I had never even touched a computer.”

Wilson is motivated to fight dementia, in part because he saw what the disease did to his wife toward the end of her life.

“When my wife died,” he says, “it would have been real easy to just become a total recluse.” Instead, Wilson embraced being socially and mentally active. He’s a member of the choir at his church, and when he’s not reading current events and books on his Kindle, he gets together with family for Mexican food.

A photo taken by a participant in the UT Dallas trial.i
A photo taken by a participant in the UT Dallas trial.
Courtesy of UT Dallas
Since Wilson participated in the trial, he says, he has noticed improvement in his memory, although he says it still isn’t perfect. He admits it can be frustrating learning to use new technology, but he knows it’s good for his brain.

So how does learning a new skill help ward off dementia? By strengthening the connections between parts of your brain, says cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman. While brain games improve a limited aspect of short-term memory, Kaufman says, challenging activities strengthen entire networks in the brain.

“It really is strengthening the connectivity between these team players of these large-scale brain networks,” he says.

Denise Park likens it to an orchestra.

“Players come in and players go out,” she says. “Sometimes when something is really demanding, the whole orchestra is playing, but they’re not playing harmoniously.”

The goal is to keep each individual player in best form, and make sure there’s coordination. And improving your own coordination, through quilting or learning to play bridge, may be a way to maintain your memory, and have a bit of fun, too.

“We hope that by maintaining a very active brain, you could defer cognitive aging by a couple of years,” Park says.

There’s one more important thing you can do to ward off memory loss: exercise. Art Kramer, a neuroscientist at the University of Illinois, studies the impact of exercise on the brain.

In one study, he found that just 45 minutes of exercise three days a week actually increased the volume of the brain. Even for people who have been very sedentary, Kramer says, exercise “improves cognition and helps people perform better on things like planning, scheduling, multitasking and working memory.”

So if you’re looking to boost memory, there’s reason to challenge both your body and your mind.

learning new skills

How Millennials like to learn

Take a look at the infographic below on how millennials like to learn.

You will see that Elearning plays a big role in this aspect.

According to some predictions, by 2020 half of all classes will be taken online. When compared to today’s statistics that say that at least one class is taken virtually, these predictions are astonishing. Obviously, we are rapidly turning to virtual classrooms. With the rapid advent of communication technology, time, space, and money, no longer pose obstacles for improvement. This is why electronic forms of learning provide just about the perfect framework for lifelong learning.

Firstly, eLearning engages students into personally relevant experiences. Moreover, it encourages development of essential skills for the 21st century: creativity, critical thinking, meaningful collaboration. Finally, it enables simulation. In other words, eLearning creates authentic atmosphere and deepens the understanding of real-world issues by fully engaging students. The ultimate goal of eLearning is to instill a high value of learning and foster lifelong learning. In other words, there is something far beyond academic achievement, that is, the learners’ ability of active contribution to the learning process.

Teaching-millenialsteaching millennials

Personal Sales Dynamics

Anyone needs to improve their sales skills?

Why do we say we hate to sell when we are in business?

Can we learn to sell better?

Expert Clay Neves will be at the Curious Mondo headquarters with a fantastic course:  Personal Sales Dynamics: Winning the Infinite Game of Profitable Business Relationships

Master The Infinite Game of Business Relationships, Networking Strategies and Systems for a Constant Flow of Repeat and Referral Business

Clay has worked with hundreds of companies improving their sales systems. Be sure to reserve your seat to this free, live, interactive class.

Personal Sales Dynamics

We have arrived!

This is so exciting! To have things coming together after so much planning and work. Today we start our online journey.

Here you will find not only announcements of our free live interactive classes but a lot of tips and information on e-learning.

We believe we are bringing the opportunity for people to improve their skills, create a secondary income or start a business in the easiest and most effective way. We also think our format is aligned with the way people want to learn.

Organized information given by great experts in an interactive and informal way wherever you are, whatever device you choose to use.

Join us on this journey!

e-leaning