How To Choose Needles For Needle Felting

This week on Felting TV we show you the different types of needles for needle felting and the purpose for each one. Happy felting!

Felting needles are barbed needles used to interlock wool fibers. As the felting needle is moved up and down, the barbs on the needles catch the scales of the wool and entangle them creating a material called felt.

needle felting needles

Interview with Megan Nedds from Woolen Wagon Felt Creations, Needle Felting

This week we interview Megan Nedds from Woolen Wangon a young felt artist with amazing animal sculptures.

She makes realistic needle felted animals sculptures

megan neds

Wool Roving, Felting Wool & Needle Felting Wool Tutorial

Wool Roving, Felting Wool & Needle Felting Wool Tutorial.

Check the different types of wool for wet felting and needle felting in this brief tutorial. covering the difference between wool roving, wool batting, wool sliver and wool top.

We show samples of our merino cross batting, New Zealand corriendale, merino top, merino silk blends and more. Also covers which wool you might choose for your wet felting and needle felting projects

 

wool roving

A Bit About Felting

We talk about fibers, needle felting, wet felting and I show a few of my creations! Share the word about felting. It is so much fun!! 🙂

FELTING is an age-old craft. Perhaps developed in the Middle East, perhaps the Far East, it is a process that has evolved with local traditions wherever it was used. And it is still used today, by kids in kindergarten to nomads on the great plains of Asia living in felt yurts. The technique is basic, requires very little experience or tools, and “mistakes” may well lead to interesting results.

felting

Feeling Overwhelmed is Your Own Fault

By Beth Stratman

The world moves so quickly these days, it feels hard to keep up. With the proliferation of available information, you can trick yourself into believing that you need to keep up with all the information and happenings. However, it isn’t simply paying attention to everything  that’s going on that makes you productive and valuable and keeps you on track with your business; it’s staying attuned to the things you’ve identified as important and relevant to your business that keeps you productive and on target.

Here are some tips for reducing feelings of overwhelm and keeping yourself on track with the things you’ve identified as important:

  • Get comfortable with the fact that most information is just noise. Just because information is accessible doesn’t mean it’s relevant to you.
  • Determine what’s fundamentally important to maximize your business and yourself. The really important things for business tend to be the basics: mission, vision, values, current goals, key performance indicators (KPIs), key relationships, and professional development for you and your staff.
  • Base your everyday tasks and activities what’s fundamentally important. Look at your calendar. Do your day-to-day appointments and scheduled blocks for projects etc. reflect the fundamentals as they relate to your position? Whether you’re the CEO or the VP of Human Resources, there are things you ought to be doing to further the company’s current goals. Are you?  If you find items that have low value related to the company’s goals, figure out what to do about them, including delegating them to others who have the capability and could grow from the opportunity.
  • Reduce your connection to irrelevant information. Doing simple things to decrease distraction can reduce feelings of overwhelm, like turning off pop-up email notifications, creating email rules that dispense with low priority email messages, and unsubscribing from email lists that you rarely find helpful.
  • Train your staff about your response priorities. Which topics are front-burner for you? What counts as an “emergency” when they should definitely interrupt you? What’s your response time for texts versus email versus phone calls and when should they use each method of communication?
  • Build time into your schedule when you are intentionally available for drop-in conversations.  This presumes that you set aside “do not disturb” time when you are focused on strategic and project work. Having “office hours” when you’re readily available encourages others to access you on your terms, not theirs.
  • Find root causes to other disruptions or time wasters. “Fires” usually occur when they wasn’t a good process in place for handling a situation. Look at ways to create or refine processes for handling most things that are likely to challenge your staff, so they learn to do things without you.
  • Question whether you really need to have or attend the meetings on your calendar. Maybe you do, but it’s good to review whether meetings are really a good use of your time.

Practice seeing through the “charms’ and “alarms” of life to keep your center. Knowing what’s important and saying “no” to the rest is the key to reducing feelings of overwhelm.

Feeling Overwhelmed